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Create your own quiz and host it on RoadToGrammar

I've just added a new tool to Road To Grammar. Now you can create a multiple choice quiz, like the ones on Road To Grammar, and save it on Road To Grammar for your students (or whoever) to use.

The best thing is that there is no log-in necessary! But you can add a password if you like. When you finish creating and uploading the quiz, you will get a unique URL where the quiz will be located. Here is an example: http://www.roadtogrammar.com/myquizzes?11qh

Try it out, create your own quiz right here: http://www.roadtogrammar.com/myquizzes/qm.htm

Comments

machy said…
Hi,

I just stumbled across your incredible website!

I was wondering if you had a diagnostic pre-test that includes at least one item of all your 365 lessons. Something like at EasyEnglish.com?

That would help the learners know exactly which lessons to take.
R2G said…
Hello Machy,

Thanks for the feedback. I have been toying with the idea of a diagnostic pre-test like the one that you mentioned, but I haven't got one at the moment. Perhaps I will work on putting one together soon.
Kevin Smith said…
quiz is best way to check their knowledge about specific topic so you must make your own quiz

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