Friday, May 07, 2010

Into it, over it, with it, done with it





It’s not the long words in English that are confusing, it’s the short ones:




Example 1:



Jack: What kind of stuff are you into?


Jill: I’m really into kickboxing.



(If you’re into it, it means you enjoy it as a kind of hobby.)





Example 2:



Jack: Are you still upset about me breaking your mug?


Jill: No, I’m over it.



(If you’re over it, it means you have stopped being upset about it. Sometimes we say, ‘gotten over it’)





Example 3:



Jack: Fred told me he didn’t know what an MP3 was!


Jill: He’s not really with it, is he?



(If you’re not with it, it means you are not very clever or up-to-date. This phrase is most often used in the negative.)




Example 4:



Jack: Can I borrow your iPad?


Jill: Sure. I’m done with it for today.



(If you’re done with it, it means you are finished with it. We sometimes say, ‘through with it’ as an alternative.)

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