Monday, December 18, 2017

Loot

Here is an interesting English word: loot

We use the word loot in English to describe something that was stolen.

The word loot is originally from India. It is a Hindi word with
Sanskrit roots. The word loot can be a noun, referring to something
stolen or taken without permission. It can also be a verb, to loot. We
also have the word 'looter' -  a person who loots.

When used as a verb, it means to go into a place and steal everything that you can. Think of a bank robber going into a bank and grabbing
all the money. We also specifically use it for the situation where,
after a hurricane or other emergency, people have to leave town and
thieves come in to steal while the town is empty. We call these people
looters.

In slang English, we use the word loot in a playful way. For example,
if a kid returns from Halloween trick or treating with a bag full of
candy, he might call it his 'loot'.

Loot is not such a common word. You won''t hear it every day, but I
bet that if you watch a movie about a bank robbery, you'll hear it a
lot!





Friday, November 24, 2017

Xmas Vocabulary Quiz

Teachers, here is a Christmas vocabulary quiz that you can use with your students:

www.roadtogrammar.com/christmas/

Suggested use: Use it with a smartboard or projector as a warm-up activity. There are 20 questions, so it will take 5-10 minutes of class time. 



Monday, October 02, 2017

New Word Game: Fonetix

Here is a new word game to try.

Use the word parts on the tiles to form a word before the timer runs out.

Try for a bonus or high score.

Play it here on PC or mobile:

http://roadtogrammar.com/fonetix/



Sunday, September 03, 2017

Conversation Questions

Here are 50 sets of conversation questions for ESL teachers. Each set contains 6 questions.

Download the PDF here: 

roadtogrammar.com/conversationquestions/R2G_Conversation_Questions.pdf

Or access the smartboard version here:

roadtogrammar.com/conversationquestions/

The smartboard version also works on smartphones.



Saturday, August 26, 2017

Word Forms

The Word Forms activity on roadtogrammar.com has been reformatted to work on mobile devices, and also given a fresh look.

Try it here: 

www.roadtogrammar.com/wordforms





Friday, August 18, 2017

100 Warm-up Questions

One of the most popular PDF downloads on Roadtogrammar is the set of 100 Warm-up questions.

It is now available as a web page with a presentation version. You can set up a question on your smartboard at the beginning of class. The students can also access the questions on their smartphones or tablets.

The PDF is here: http://roadtogrammar.com/dl/warmers.php
The web version is here: http://www.roadtogrammar.com/warmers/


Thursday, July 27, 2017

Salmon and Often

Salmon and Often


I've often noticed that speakers of English as a second language mispronounce salmon.

It looks like it is straightforward enough to pronounce: sal - mon, but in fact the L is silent. To pronounce it correctly, imagine that the spelling is "sammon". It rhymes more or less with 'famine' even though the spelling is quite different. (English is strange that way.)

On the other hand, 'often' is one of those words that has two accepted pronunciations - with or without the 't' sound. This is not a UK/US thing; the words simply has two accepted ways to pronounce it. There are many words in English like this. Like I said, English is strange.

You can listen to the pronunciation(s) of these words here:


The Cambridge dictionary doesn't give the audio pronunciation for 'often' with a t sound, but it lists the phonetic spelling for it.)

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

2 Common Mistakes

















Do you ever make these two mistakes in your English?

Common mistake 1:

A: Would you like a drink?
B: Yes, I like some coffee?

"I like some coffee" is not correct. The speaker means to say: "I'd like some coffee" or "I would like some coffee".

"I would like" is a polite way to say "I want". It is different from "I like".


Common mistake 2:

A: Can I have a napkin?
B: Sure, I get you one.

"I get you one" is not correct. It should be "I'll get you one". We use the future form here, even though it is the near future!

It is easy to make this mistake because "I get" and "I'll get" might sound alike to English learners. However, people who are proficient in English can easily hear the difference!


If you tend to make these mistakes, don't worry - it is quite easy to correct yourself.

Wednesday, July 05, 2017

Vocab Maze - A Wordsearch Game

Here is a simple and fun game for ESL learners.

You are given a topic and you have to find three related words in a mini word grid.

It's simple, fun, fast and it works on mobile devices too.

Play it here: www.roadtogrammar.com/vocabmaze/




Monday, June 26, 2017

Patchwork - ESL Vocab Game

Patchwork is a simple game that is easy to play and suitable for low to intermediate level ESL learners. It is especially suitable for kids.

To play, simply match the different parts of the word from the tiles given. There are two-part words, three-part words and four-part words, too. Topics include animals, descriptions (adjectives), actions (verbs), food, clothes and more.

Play Patchwork here:






Preposition Practice

It's time to practise prepositions with this new quiz for 2018! www.roadtogrammar.com/prepositions/